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GETTING STARTED WITH ENJAYMO

A strong game plan can mean a strong comeback
The ENJAYMO dosing schedule is designed to provide a continuous level of medicine. ENJAYMO is given as an intravenous (IV) infusion weekly for the first 2 weeks, and then every 2 weeks thereafter. Your dose of ENJAYMO (either 6.5 g or 7.5 g) is based on your body weight, which your doctor will determine for you.
SETTING your course with ENJAYMO
The infusion process can vary depending on individual needs, but here's an example of what you may expect. Be sure to speak with your healthcare provider with any questions you may have.
Getting ready for your infusion
Before using ENJAYMO, you should talk to your doctor about all your medical conditions, the medicine you take, and what tests and vaccinations you require before and while on treatment
What to expect during your infusion
ENJAYMO is administered by a healthcare provider through a vein by intravenous infusion over 1 to 2 hours
On the day of infusion, a member of your treatment team will bring your ENJAYMO up to room temperature
After your infusion, you'll be monitored for allergic reactions by your treatment team for at least 2 hours on your first visit, and for at least 1 hour after for future infusions
Make sure you stick to your treatment plan
Make sure to arrive for your infusion on time and do not miss an appointment as treatment interruptions may cause the return of chronic hemolysis symptoms
Enjaymo Patient solutions
Our support program provides eligible patients with financial and insurance assistance, education, and more.
INDICATION
ENJAYMO is a prescription medicine used to decrease the need for red blood cell transfusion due to the breakdown of red blood cells (hemolysis) in adults with cold agglutinin disease (CAD).

It is not known if ENJAYMO is safe and effective in children
INDICATION & IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Do not receive ENJAYMO if you are allergic to sutimlimab-jome or any of the ingredients in ENJAYMO.
ENJAYMO can cause serious side effects, including:
Serious Infections: ENJAYMO is a prescription medicine that affects your immune system. ENJAYMO can lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections. People who take ENJAYMO may have an increased risk of getting infections caused by certain kinds of bacteria such as Neisseria meningitides, Streptococcus pneumoniae , and Haemophilus influenzae . These infections may be serious or life-threatening. Some infections may quickly become life-threatening or cause death if not recognized and treated early.
You need to receive vaccinations against infections caused by certain kinds of bacteria at least 2 weeks before your first dose of ENJAYMO. You may need to have additional vaccinations during treatment
If your healthcare provider decides that urgent treatment with ENJAYMO is needed, you should receive vaccinations as soon as possible.
Vaccinations may reduce the risk of these infections, but do not prevent all infections. Call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away if you get any new signs and symptoms of an infection, including:
fever
severe headache with stiff neck or back
pain during urination or urinating more often than usual
cough or difficulty breathing
flu-like symptoms
pain, redness or swelling of the skin
Infusion-related reactions: Treatment with ENJAYMO may cause infusion-related reactions, including allergic reactions that may be serious or life-threatening. Your healthcare provider may slow down or stop your ENJAYMO infusion if you have an infusion-related reaction, and will treat your symptoms if needed. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop symptoms during your ENJAYMO infusion that may mean you are having an infusion-related reaction, including:
shortness of breath
rapid heartbeat
nausea
flushing
headache
Risk of autoimmune disease: ENJAYMO may increase your risk for developing an autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Tell your healthcare provider and get medical help if you develop any symptoms of SLE, including:
joint pain or swelling
rash on the cheeks and nose
unexplained fever
If you have CAD and you stop receiving ENJAYMO, your healthcare provider should monitor you closely for return of your symptoms after you stop ENJAYMO. Stopping ENJAYMO may cause the breakdown of your red blood cells due to CAD to return. Symptoms or problems that can happen due to red blood cell breakdown include:
tiredness
shortness of breath
rapid heart rate
blood in your urine or dark urine
The most common side effects of ENJAYMO include:
respiratory tract infection
viral infection
diarrhea
indigestion
cough
joint pain
joint inflammation (arthritis)
swelling of the lower legs, ankles, and feet
These are not all the possible side effects of ENJAYMO. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.
Before receiving ENJAYMO, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:
have a fever or infection, including a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B, or hepatitis C.
have an autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), also known as lupus.
are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if ENJAYMO will harm your unborn baby.
are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if ENJAYMO passes into your breast milk.
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.
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